Innovation Evaluation Model Descriptors of Practice / Rubrics

Approved by RIDE for
Gradual Implementation, 2011-2012

Standard 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy

 

Performance Indicators: Knowledge of Content and the Structure of the Discipline, Knowledge of Prerequisite Relationships, Knowledge of Content-Related Pedagogy

Teachers provide evidence of their knowledge of content and pedagogy through their performance in the classroom. They must have sufficient command of the subject to guide student learning. They must also know how their content fits into a larger context. Since every discipline has its own approach to instruction, teachers need to tailor their pedagogy to their content.  Knowledge of content and pedagogy is not stagnant, but evolves over time and requires on-going learning to reflect 21st Century Skills and learners.

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Knowledge of Content and the Structure of the Discipline

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

In planning and practice, teacher makes content errors, or does not correct errors made by students.

Teacher is familiar with the important concepts in the discipline, but may display lack of awareness of how these concepts relate to one another.

Teacher displays solid knowledge of the important concepts in the discipline and how these relate to one another and to 21st century skills.

Teacher displays extensive knowledge of the important concepts in the discipline and how these relate both to one another and to other disciplines, and to 21st century skills.

Knowledge of Prerequisite Relationships

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Teacher’s plans and practice display little understanding of prerequisite relationships important to student learning of the content.

Teacher’s plans and practice indicate some awareness of prerequisite relationships, although such knowledge may be inaccurate of or incomplete.

Teacher’s plans and practice reflect accurate understanding of prerequisite relationships among topics and concepts.

Teacher’s plans and practices reflect understanding of prerequisite relationships among topics and concepts and a link to the students’ cognitive learning processes.

Knowledge of Content-Related Pedagogy

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Teacher displays little or no understanding of the range of pedagogical approaches suitable to student learning of the content.

Teacher’s plans and practice reflect a limited range of pedagogical approaches or some approaches that are not suitable to the discipline or to the students.

Teacher’s plans and practice reflect familiarity with a range of effective pedagogical approaches in the discipline, appropriate technology and 21st Century Skills.

Teacher’s plans and practice reflect a wide range of effective pedagogical approaches in the discipline, and the embedded use of appropriate technology, and 21st Century skills.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1b: Demonstrating Knowledge of Students

 

Performance Indicators: Knowledge of Child and Adolescent Development; Knowledge of the Learning Process; Knowledge of Students’ Skills, Knowledge, and

 

Language Proficiency; Knowledge of Students’ Interests and Cultural Heritage; Knowledge of Students’ Special Needs

 

It is not enough for teachers to know and understand childhood or adolescent developmental norms. Teachers must also know their students: their strengths and weaknesses, their interests, their readiness levels and skill sets, and the outside influences that affect their learning: family dynamics, cultural customs, socio-economic status. Furthermore, teachers must demonstrate this knowledge and understanding and also incorporate appropriate 21st century skills in the planning and preparation of their lessons.

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Knowledge of Child and Adolescent Development

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Teacher displays little or no knowledge of the developmental characteristics of the age group.

Teacher displays partial knowledge of the developmental characteristics of the age group.

Teacher displays accurate knowledge of the typical developmental characteristics of the age group, as well as exceptions to the general patterns.

In addition to accurate knowledge of the typical developmental characteristics of the age group, and exceptions to the general patterns, teacher displays knowledge of the extent to which individual students follow the general patterns and how 21st century skills fit into this knowledge base.

Knowledge of the Learning Process

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Teacher sees no value in understanding how students learn, and does not seek such information.

Teacher recognizes the value of knowing how students learn, but this knowledge is limited or outdated.

Teacher’s knowledge of how students learn is accurate and current. Teacher applies this knowledge to the class as a whole and to groups of students.

Teacher displays extensive and subtle understanding of how students learn and how 21st century skills apply, and then applies this knowledge to individual students.

Knowledge of Students’ Skills, Knowledge, and Language Proficiency

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

 

Teacher displays little or no knowledge of students’ skills, knowledge, and language proficiency, does not indicate that such knowledge is valuable.

Teacher recognizes the value of understanding and tracking students’ skills, knowledge, and language proficiency, but displays this knowledge only for the class as a whole.

Teacher recognizes the value of understanding and tracking students’ skills, knowledge, and language proficiency, and displays this knowledge for groups of students in order to determine growth over time.

Teacher understands and tracks individual students’ skills, knowledge, and language proficiency, and has a strategy for maintaining such information in order to determine growth over time for each student.

 

 

Knowledge of Students’ Interests and Cultural Heritage

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Teacher displays little or no knowledge of students’ interests or cultural heritage, and does not indicate that such knowledge is valuable.

Teacher recognizes the value of understanding students’ interests and cultural heritage, but this knowledge extends only to the class as a whole groups.

Teacher recognizes the value of understanding students’ interests and cultural heritage, and this knowledge extends to specific groups of students.

Teacher recognizes the value of understanding students’ interests and cultural heritage, and this knowledge extends to individual students.

Knowledge of Students’ Special Needs

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Teacher’s displays little or no awareness of the importance of knowing students’ special learning or medical needs, and such knowledge may be incomplete or inaccurate.

Teacher possesses information about each student’s learning and medical needs, collecting such information from a variety of sources.

Teacher possesses information about each student’s learning and medical needs, collecting such information from a variety of sources and applies this knowledge to individual students.

Teacher possesses information about each student’s learning and medical needs, collecting such information from a variety of sources and applies this knowledge to individual students, advocating for those students.

 

 


Standard 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1c: Establishing Instructional Outcomes

Performance Indicators: Value, Sequence, Alignment, Clarity, Balance, Suitability for diverse learners

Teaching is goal directed and designed to achieve certain well-defined purposes.  It is through the articulation of instructional outcomes that the teacher describes these purposes.  They should be clear and related to what it is that the students are intended to learn as a consequence of instruction.  [FFT pg 51]  21st Century outcomes must be included, as students must also learn the essential skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, communication and collaboration.

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Value and Sequence and Alignment

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Outcomes represent low expectations for students and lack of rigor. They do not reflect important learning in the discipline nor a connection to a sequence of learning.

Outcomes represent moderately high expectations and rigor. Some reflect important learning in the discipline and at least some connection to a sequence of learning.

Most outcomes represent high expectations and rigor, and important learning in the discipline. They are connected to a sequence of learning defined in content standards and align with 21st Century Skills.

All outcomes represent high expectations and rigor, and important learning in the discipline. They are connected to a sequence of learning both in the discipline content standards and related disciplines and align with 21st Century Skills.

Clarity

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Outcomes are either not clear or are stated in terms of student learning but as activities. Outcomes do not permit viable methods of assessment.

Outcomes are only moderately clear, or are stated as a combination of student learning and activities. Some outcomes permit viable methods of assessment.

The outcomes are clear, and stated in terms of student learning. Most suggest viable methods of assessment.

All the outcomes are clear, written in the form of student learning, and permit viable methods of assessment that are aligned with content standards and 21st century skills.

Balance

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Outcomes reflect only one type of learning and only one discipline or strand.

Outcomes reflect several types of learning across disciplines, but the teacher has made no attempt at coordination or integration.

Outcomes reflect several different types of learning across disciplines and there are opportunities for coordination including application of 21st Century Skills.

Outcomes reflect several different types of learning across multiple disciplines and there are opportunities for both coordination and integration, and include application of 21st Century Skills.

Suitability for Diverse Learners

RIPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Outcomes are not suitable for the class, or are not based on any assessment of student needs.

Most of the outcomes are suitable for most of the students in the class based on general assessments of student learning.

Most of the outcomes are suitable for all students in the class, and are based on assessment of student proficiency measured against defined content and 21st century skill standards.

Outcomes are based on a comprehensive assessment of student learning and take into account the varying needs of individual students or groups, assessing their proficiency against defined content and 21st century skill standards.

 

 

Standard 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1d: Knowledge of Resources

 

Performance Indicators: Resources for classroom use, Resources to extend content knowledge and pedagogy

Skilled teachers have knowledge of a variety of resources and are constantly adding these to their repertoire. The persistently search for appropriate 21st century resources that can inform their teaching. They effectively incorporate these tools in varied contexts for a variety of purposes.

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Resources for Classroom and Students

RIPTS 1, 2, 3

Teacher is unaware of resources for classroom or student use available through the school or district.

Teacher has limited awareness of resources available for classroom and/or student use through the school or district, and some awareness of resources external to the school and on the Internet.

Teacher is aware of resources available for classroom and student use through the school or district, and is familiar with resources external to the school and on the Internet.

Teacher’s knowledge of resources for classroom and student use is extensive and informs communication with students, including those available through the school or district, in the community, professional organizations and universities, and on the Internet.

Resources To Extend Content Knowledge and Pedagogy

RIPTS 1, 2, 3

Teacher is unaware of resources to enhance content and pedagogical knowledge available through the school or district.

Teacher has limited awareness of resources to enhance content and pedagogical knowledge available through the school or district, and some awareness of resources external to the school and on the Internet.

Teacher is aware of resources to enhance content and pedagogical knowledge available through the school or district, and is familiar with resources external to the school and on the Internet.

Teacher’s knowledge of resources to enhance content and pedagogical knowledge is extensive, beyond those available through the school or district, including professional organizations and universities, and on the Internet.


Standard 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction

Performance Indicators: Learning activities, Instructional materials and resources, Instructional groups, Lesson and unit structure

A teacher translates instructional outcomes into learning experiences for students through the design of instruction.  Even in classrooms where students assume considerable responsibility for their learning, teachers must design instruction that is coherent and balanced between careful planning and flexibility in execution.  Teachers design instruction that reflects the needs of 21st century learners and include opportunities to collaborate, innovate, create and solve problems using high-level cognitive processes and communication tools and media.

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Learning Activities

 

RIPTS 1, 2, 3

 

 

Learning activities are not suitable to students or to instructional purposes, and are not designed to engage students in active intellectual activity.

Only some of the learning activities are suitable to students or to the instructional outcomes. Some represent a moderate cognitive challenge, but with no differentiation for different students.

Learning activities are suitable to students or to the instructional outcomes, and most represent significant cognitive challenge, and with some differentiation for different groups of students, help students to construct content knowledge and build 21st Century Skills.

All learning activities are highly suitable to diverse learners and support the instructional outcomes. They represent significant cognitive challenge, and with differentiation for individual students help students to construct content knowledge and build 21st Century Skills.

 Instructional Materials and Resources

 

RIPTS 1, 2, 3

Materials and resources are not suitable for students, do not support the instructional outcomes nor engage students in meaningful learning.

Some of the materials, technology, and resources are suitable to students, support the instructional outcomes, and engage students in meaningful learning.

Materials and resources are suitable to students, support the instructional outcomes, and are designed to engage students in meaningful learning, including the appropriate use of technology.

All of the materials and resources are suitable to students, support the instructional outcomes, and are designed to engage students in meaningful learning, including the appropriate use of technology and of student participation in selecting or adapting materials.

Instructional Groups

 

RIPTS 1, 2, 3

 

Instructional groups do not support the instructional outcomes and offer no variety.

Instructional groups partially support the instructional outcomes, with an effort at providing some variety.

Instructional groups are varied as appropriate to the students and the different instructional outcomes.

Instructional groups are varied as appropriate to the students and the different instructional outcomes. There is evidence of student choice in selecting the different patterns of instructional groups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson and

Unit Structure

RIPTS 1, 2, 3

The lesson or unit has no clearly defined structure, or the structure is chaotic. Activities do not follow an organized progression, and time allocations are unrealistic.

The lesson or unit has a recognizable structure, although the structure is not uniformly maintained throughout. Progression of activities is uneven, with unreasonable time allocations.

The lesson or unit has a clearly defined structure around which activities are organized. Progression of activities is even, with reasonable time allocations.

The lesson or unit’s structure is clear and allows for different pathways according to diverse student needs, anticipating student misconceptions, and the needs of 21st century learners. The progression of activities is highly coherent with appropriate time allocations.

 


Standard 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1f: Designing Student Assessment

 

Performance Indicators: Alignment with Instructional Outcomes, Criteria and Standards, Design of On-going Formative Assessments, Use of Both Formative and

 

Summative Data for Planning

 

Teachers plan and design lessons that reflect an understanding of their disciplines, including an understanding of instructional standards, concepts, and principles. Teachers value each discipline and the relationships between disciplines and design on-going formative assessments that measure student progress. Teachers use multiple measures to demonstrate student growth over time.

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Congruence with Instructional Outcomes

 

RIPTS 4, 5, 9

Assessment procedures are not aligned or congruent with instructional outcomes

Some of the instructional outcomes are aligned / congruent with the proposed approach, but many are not

The instructional outcomes are aligned / congruent with the approach to assessment; assessment methodologies may have been adapted for groups of students.

 

The proposed approach to assessment is fully aligned / congruent with the instructional outcomes, in both content and process.  Assessment methodologies may have been adapted for individual students as needed.

Criteria and Standards

 

RIPTS 4, 5, 9

The proposed approach contains no criteria or standards.

Assessment criteria and standards have been developed, but they are not clear.

 

Assessment criteria and standards are clear and aligned with grade level content standards and 21st century skills.

Assessment criteria and standards are clear, aligned with grade level content standards and 21st century skills; there is evidence that the students contributed to their development and creation of assessment tools and exemplars.

Design of Formative Assessments

 

RIPTS 4, 5, 9

Teacher does not use, understand, or has no plan to incorporate formative assessment in the lesson or unit.

 

Teacher’s understanding of and plan for the use of formative assessment is rudimentary, addressing only some of the instructional outcomes, and only minimally effective at uncovering student misconceptions and misunderstandings.

The teacher demonstrates an understanding of planning and use of formative assessment strategies, and has identified specific formative assessment approaches to monitor student learning, and uncover student misconceptions or misunderstandings so instruction can be adjusted.

The teacher demonstrates a thorough understanding of the use formative assessment strategies and explicitly plans to use those strategies to monitor student learning, and uncover student misconceptions or misunderstandings so instruction can be adjusted. The teacher’s use of formative assessment incorporates peers as resources for one another, and peer and student self-assessment to revise and improve student work.

 

 

 

Use of Assessment Data for Planning

 

RIPTS 4, 5, 9

Teacher rarely and ineffectively uses multiple measures of student growth including formative and summative data that may include student work, to demonstrate student learning. Teacher has no plans to use assessment data results in designing future instruction.

Teacher inconsistently uses multiple measures of student growth including both formative and summative data that includes student work to demonstrate student learning. Teacher plans to use assessment data results to plan for future instruction for the class as a whole.

Teacher uses multiple measures of student growth including both formative and summative data that includes student work to demonstrate student learning. Teacher plans to use assessment data results to plan for future instruction for groups of students.

Teacher consistently uses multiple measures of student growth including both formative and summative data including student work to demonstrate a high level of student learning. Teacher plans to use assessment data results to plan future instruction for individual students.

Analysis of data; maintaining a data system to show growth over time

 

RIPTS 4, 5, 9

The teacher does not maintain an assessment system with which he/she can reflect upon instruction; or the system used has little to no alignment with instructional practices and consequently cannot show the degree to which instruction helped students attain the learning objectives. There is evidence that students do not achieve the desired levels of achievement over time.

Teacher uses a rudimentary assessment system to reflect on his/her instruction; there is minimal alignment between instructional practices and the degree to which students attain the desired learning objectives, and the teacher can provide little correlation between students’ growth over time and instructional practices. Student growth over time is inconsistent in attaining the desired level of achievement.

 

Teacher uses a comprehensive assessment system to reflect on his/her instruction; establishing alignment between his/her instructional practices and the degree to which students attain the desired learning objectives. The teacher can establish a correlation between students’ growth over time and his/her adjustments in instruction to meet student needs. There is evidence of consistent student growth over time in attaining the desired levels of achievement.

 

Teacher uses a comprehensive assessment system and, with students, uses the system to reflect on his/her instructional; and establishes explicit alignment between his/her instructional practices and the degree to which students attain the desired learning objectives. The teachers and students establish a correlation between students’ growth over time and adjustments in instruction to meet students’ needs. There is evidence that students consistently meet or exceed the desired levels of achievement over time.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Rationale for Standard 2: Classroom Environment

 

The classroom environment is a critical aspect of a teacher’s skill in promoting learning. Students can’t concentrate on academic content if they don’t feel comfortable in the classroom. If the atmosphere is negative, if students fear ridicule, if the environment is chaotic, no one – neither students nor teacher – can focus on learning.

 

Teachers who excel in Standard 2 create an atmosphere of excitement about the importance of learning and the significance of the content. Skills in Standard 2 are demonstrated through classroom interactions and observations. [FFT pp. 64, 28, 29]

 

Standard 2: The Classroom Environment

Component 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport

 

Performance Indicators: Teacher interaction with students; Student interaction with one another

 

Teaching depends, fundamentally, on the quality of relationships among individuals. When teachers strive to engage students in a discussion or an activity, their interactions with them speak volumes about the extent to which they value students as people. [FFT p. 64]

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Teacher Interaction with Students

 

RIPTS 5, 6

Teacher interaction with at least some students is negative, demeaning, sarcastic, or inappropriate to the age or culture of the students. Students exhibit disrespect for the teacher.

Teacher-student interactions are generally appropriate but may reflect occasional inconsistencies, favoritism, or disregard for students’ cultures. Students exhibit only minimal respect for the teacher.

Teacher-student interactions demonstrate caring and respect. Such interactions are appropriate to the age and cultures of the students. Students exhibit respect for the teacher.

Teacher’s interactions with students reflect sincere respect, caring, and cultural understanding, for individuals as well as groups of students. Students appear to trust the teacher with sensitive information and have a mutual respect and open dialogue in a variety of contexts.

Student Interactions with One Another

 

RIPTS 5, 6

Student interactions are characterized by conflict, sarcasm, or put-downs.

Student interactions are generally polite and respectful when monitored by teacher.

Student interactions are polite and respectful at all times.

Students demonstrate sincere caring for one another and monitor one another’s treatment of peers, correcting classmates respectfully when needed, and assume and demonstrate personal responsibility.

 


Standard 2: The Classroom Environment

Component 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning

 

Performance Indicators: Importance of the content, Expectations for learning and achievement, Student pride in work

“A culture for learning” refers to the atmosphere in the classroom that reflects the importance of the work undertaken by both students and teacher. It describes the norms that govern the interactions among individuals about the activities and assignments, the look of the classroom, and the general “tone” of the class. A culture for learning implies high expectations for all students and classrooms are cognitively busy places. Both students and teacher see the content as important, and students take obvious pride in their work and are eager to share with others.   [FFT p. 67]

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

 Importance of the Content

RIPTS 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9

Teacher or students convey a negative attitude toward the content, suggesting that it is not important or has been mandated by others.

Teacher communicates importance of the work but with little conviction and only minimal apparent buy-in by the students.

Teacher conveys genuine enthusiasm for the content, and students demonstrate consistent commitment to its value.

Students demonstrate through their active participation, curiosity, and taking initiative that they value the content’s importance.

Expectations for Learning and Achievement

 

RIPTS 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9

Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey low expectations for at least some students.

Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey only modest expectations for student learning and achievement and only minimally reflect grade level content standards or 21st century skills.

Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey high expectations for students, and are aligned with the appropriate grade level content standards and 21st century skills.

Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey high expectations for all students, and are aligned with the appropriate grade level content standards and 21st century skills. Students appear to have internalized these expectations and can verbalize learning expectations and/or create grade level exemplars.

Student Pride in Work

 

RIPTS 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9

Students demonstrate little or no pride in their work. They seem to be motivated by the desire to complete a task rather than to do high-quality work.

Students minimally accept the responsibility to “do good work” but invest little of their energy into its quality.

Students accept the teacher’s insistence on work of high quality and demonstrate pride in that work through perseverance.

Students accept the teacher’s insistence on work of high quality and demonstrate pride in that work through perseverance and to detail while showing innovation, flexibility, and originality. Students use problem-solving skills to influence and guide others toward a goal.

 

 

Standard 2: The Classroom Environment

Component 2c: Managing Classroom Procedures

 

Performance Indicators: Management of instructional groups, Management of transitions, Management of materials and supplies, Performance of non-instructional duties, Supervision of volunteers and paraprofessionals

A smoothly functioning classroom is a prerequisite to good instruction. Teachers find that they must develop procedures for the smooth operation of the classroom and the efficient use of time before they can focus on instructional techniques. One of the marks of expert teachers is that they can take the time required to establish their routines and procedures at the outset of the school year. A hallmark of a well-managed classroom is one in which students are able to work independently and where differentiated instruction occurs. Another important aspect of classroom management relates to how a teacher handles transitions between activities. Expert teachers make highly efficient use of time in their management of non-instructional tasks and are familiar with and are successful executing school emergency procedures. [FFT pp. 69-70]

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Management of Instructional Groups

RIPTS 6

Students not working with the teacher are not productively engaged in learning.

Students in only some groups are productively engaged in learning while unsupervised by the teacher.

Small group work is well organized and most students are productively engaged in learning while unsupervised by the teacher.

Small group work is well organized and students are productively engaged at all times, with students assuming responsibility for productivity. Students work independently and collaboratively to solve problems and accomplish goals.

Management of Transitions

RIPTS 6

Transitions are chaotic, with much time being lost between activities or lesson segments.

Only some transitions are efficient, resulting in some loss of instructional time.

Transitions occur smoothly, with little loss of instructional time.

Transitions are seamless, with students assuming responsibility in ensuring their efficient operation.

Management of Materials And Supplies

RIPTS 6

Materials and supplies are handled inefficiently, resulting in significant loss of instructional time.

Routines for handling materials and supplies function moderately well.

Routines for handling materials and supplies occur smoothly, with little loss of instructional time.

Routines for effectively using a variety of tools/media and handling materials and supplies are seamless, with students assuming some responsibility for smooth operation.

Performance of Non-Instructional Duties

RIPTS 6

Considerable instructional time is lost in performing non-instructional duties.

Systems for performing non-instructional duties are only fairly efficient, resulting in some loss of instructional time.

Efficient systems for performing non-instructional duties are in place, resulting in minimal loss of instructional time.

Systems for performing non-instructional duties are well established, with students assuming considerable responsibility for efficient operation.

Supervision of Volunteers And Paraprofessionals

RIPTS 6

Volunteers and paraprofessionals have no clearly defined duties and are idle most of the time.

Volunteers and paraprofessionals are productively engaged during portions of class time but require frequent supervision.

Volunteers and paraprofessionals are productively and independently engaged during the entire class.

Volunteers and paraprofessionals make a substantive contribution to the classroom environment.

 

 


Standard 2: The Classroom Environment

Component 2d: Managing Student Behavior

 

Performance Indicators: Expectations, Monitoring of student behavior, response to student misbehavior

A key to efficient and respectful management of student behavior lies in agreed upon standards of conduct and clear consequences for overstepping bounds. Expert teachers successfully enlist students in both setting and maintaining standards of conduct. Active participation in setting the rules of the classroom contributes to students’ feelings of safety in class.  In a well-managed classroom, students themselves will be able to explain the agree-upon standards of conduct.  [FFT. Pp. 71, 73]

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Behavioral Expectations

RIPTS 6

No standards of conduct appear to have been established, or students are confused as to what the standards are.

Standards of conduct appear to have been established, and most students seem to understand them.

Standards of conduct are clear to all students.

Standards of conduct are clear to all students and appear to have been developed with student participation.

Monitoring Student Behavior

RIPTS 6

Student behavior is not monitored, and teacher is unaware of what the students are doing.

Teacher is generally aware of student behavior but may miss the activities of some students.

Teacher is alert to student behavior at all times.

Monitoring by teacher is subtle and preventive. Students monitor their own and their peers’ behavior, correcting one another respectfully.

Responding to Student Misbehavior

RIPTS 6

Teacher does not respond to misbehavior, or the response is inconsistent, overly repressive, or does not respect the student’s dignity.

Teacher attempts to respond to student misbehavior but with uneven results, or infractions of the rules are minor.

Teacher response to misbehavior is appropriate and successful and respects the student’s dignity, or student behavior is generally appropriate.

Teacher response to misbehavior is highly effective and sensitive to students’ individual needs, or student behavior is entirely appropriate.

 

 

 


Standard 2: The Classroom Environment

Component 2e: Organizing Physical Space

 

This component is NOT scored, but can be referenced during pre and/or post conferences

 

Performance Indicators: Safety and accessibility, Arrangement of furniture and use of physical resources

Use of physical space is important in a total learning environment; the physical surroundings can have a material effect on interactions or the structure of activities. The use of the physical environment will vary depending on context. Organization of space sends signals to the students about how teachers view learning. Performance Indicators of a successful classroom environment include safety and accessibility to learning, arrangement of furniture, and the use of physical resources and technology. When a classroom is a true community of learners, students themselves become involved in the physical environment and take initiative in making it effective.

 

Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Safety and Accessibility

RIPTS 4, 6

The classroom is unsafe, or learning is not accessible to some students.

The classroom is safe, and at least essential learning is accessible to most students.

The classroom is safe, and learning is equally accessible to all students.

The classroom is safe, and students themselves ensure that all learning is equally accessible to all students.

Arrangement of furniture and use of physical resources.

RIPTS 4, 6

The furniture arrangement hinders the learning activities, or the teacher makes poor use of physical resources.

Teacher uses physical resources adequately. The furniture / room arrangement may be adjusted for a lesson, but with limited effectiveness.

Teacher uses physical resources skillfully, and the furniture / room arrangement is a resource for learning activities.

Both teacher and students use physical resources and technology easily and skillfully, and students adjust the furniture / room arrangement to advance their learning.

 


Standard 3: Instruction

Introductory Statement:

Effective instruction is the critical interactive work that teachers undertake when they bring complex content to life for students. Teachers design instruction to integrate content areas and weave together knowledge of students, content, assessment, and reflection in the instructional process.   Instruction is characterized by the following actions: communicating with students, using questioning techniques, engaging students in learning, using assessments in instruction, and demonstrating flexibility and responsiveness. Teachers use available technologies to scaffold student learning. There is an emphasis on teacher facilitation and fostering student ownership, problem solving, inquiry, real-life connections and relevance.   Teachers prepare students for the future by fostering creativity, critical thinking, communication, and collaboration.

 

Standard 3: Instruction

Component 3a: Communicating With Students

 

Performance Indicators: Expectations for learning, Directions and procedures, Explanations of content, Use of oral, written, and visual/graphic communication

 

The presentation of a lesson potentially impacts the outcome of the lesson.  In order to successfully engage students in the lesson, teachers need to clearly frame the purpose of the lesson including presenting the context.  Teachers will be assessed on their ability to create reasonable and appropriate expectations for learning, provide directions and describe procedures with clarity to explain content, through the effective use of oral and written language.

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

 Expectations for Learning

RIPTS 8

The teacher’s purpose in a lesson or unit is unclear to students.

Teacher attempts to explain the instructional purpose, with limited success. Learning expectations are minimally connected to content standards and 21st century skills.

Teacher’s purpose of the lesson or unit is clear, including where it is situated within broader learning. Learning expectations are aligned with grade level content standards and 21st century skill expectations with explanations of how students will demonstrate their learning.

Teacher makes the purpose of the lesson or unit clear, including where it is situated within broader authentic learning, linking that purpose to student interests. Learning expectations are aligned with grade level content standards and 21st century skills, with exemplars to guide student achievement and clearly defined success criteria.

Directions and Procedures

RIPTS 8

Teacher directions and procedures are confusing to students.

Teacher directions and procedures are clarified after initial student confusion.

Teacher directions and procedures are clear to students.

Teacher directions and procedures are clear, complete, and anticipate possible student misunderstanding.

 

 

Explanation of Content

RIPTS 8

Teacher’s explanation of the content is unclear or confusing, or uses inappropriate language.

Teacher’s explanation of the content is uneven: some is done skillfully; other portions are difficult to follow. There is little connection to content standards and 21st century skills.

Teacher’s explanation of content is appropriate and connects with students’ knowledge and experience, and the appropriate content standards and 21st century skills.

Teacher’s explanation of content is imaginative and connects with students’ knowledge and experience and the appropriate content standards and 21st century skills. Students contribute to explaining concepts to their peers.

Use of Oral, Written, Language

RIPTS 8

Teacher’s communication in unintelligible, inaudible, or written language in illegible, Spoken or written language contains errors of grammar or syntax. Vocabulary may be inappropriate, vague, or used incorrectly, leaving students confused.

Teacher’s communication is intelligible, but lacks clarity. Spoken language is audible, and written language is legible. Both are used correctly and conform to standard English. Vocabulary is correct but limited or is not appropriate to the students’ ages or backgrounds.

Teacher’s spoken and written language is clear and correct and conforms to standard English. Vocabulary is appropriate to the students’ ages and interests, resulting in communication that is clear, correct, and is appropriate to the students’ ages and cultures.

Teacher’s communication is correct, conforms to standard English, expressive, and enriches the lesson. Teacher finds opportunities to extend student vocabularies, language acquisition and learning.

 

 


Standard 3: Instruction

Component 3b: Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques

 

Performance Indicators: Quality of questions, Discussion techniques, Student participation

Skillful teachers use questions and discussion to promote student participation and learning. 

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

 Quality of Questions and Engineering Techniques

RIPTS 5

Teacher’s questions are of poor quality, with low cognitive challenge and single correct responses, and may be asked in rapid succession. Questions are largely closed in nature and emphasize rote response or low-level thinking. Questions do not invite a thoughtful response.

Teacher’s questions are a combination of low and mid-level quality that requires a combination of low and moderate, thinking. Only some invite a thoughtful response. Questions are not delivered in a manner that require all students to engage cognitively or to prepare responses to the questions.

Most of teacher’s questions are of high quality and require higher order thinking skills that engage students in further discussion. Questions are delivered using techniques that require students to engage cognitively and prepare to respond to the question.

Teacher’s questions are of uniformly high quality and require high order thinking, challenge students to think and invite students to demonstrate reasoning and engage cognitively. Students formulate many of their own questions to advance their understanding. Questions are delivered using techniques that require all students to engage cognitively and prepare to respond to the question, and promote student-to-student interaction and dialogue.

Discussion Techniques

RIPTS 5

The teacher mediating all questions and answers characterizes interaction between teacher and students.

Teacher makes some attempt to engage students in an authentic discussion with uneven results.

Teacher creates an authentic discussion among students, stepping aside when appropriate.

Students assume considerable responsibility for the success of the discussion; initiating topics and making thoughtful, unsolicited contributions that demonstrate innovative thinking.

Student Participation

RIPTS 5

The teacher and/or a few students dominate the discussion.

Teacher attempts to engage all students in the discussion, but instructional and questioning techniques result in only limited success.

Teacher uses instructional and questioning techniques that successfully engage students in the discussion.

Teacher functions as facilitator and uses instructional and questioning techniques that engage all students in the discussion. Students themselves ensure that all voices and ideas are heard in the discussion.

 

 


Standard 3: Instruction

Component 3c: Engaging Student in Learning

 

Performance Indicators: Activities and assignments, Grouping of students, Instructional materials and resources, Structure and pacing

Teachers engage students in active construction of understanding by creating intellectual challenges that result in new knowledge.  The ownership of learning transfers from the teacher to the students. Teachers’ effective use of activities and assignments, grouping of students, instructional materials, technologies and resources, and structure and pacing, all contribute to a classroom where students are deeply engaged in learning.

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Projects, Activities and Assignments

RIPTS 5

Projects, activities and assignments lack challenge or are inappropriate. Students are not cognitively engaged.

Projects, activities and assignments lack appropriate challenge for all students; only some students are cognitively engaged.

Projects, activities and assignments are appropriately challenging for all students, require 21st century skills, and almost all students are cognitively engaged in complex learning.

Projects, activities, and assignments are appropriately challenging for all students and are tightly aligned to 21st century learning skills. Students themselves adapt or suggest assignments to meet their academic needs. All students are cognitively engaged in complex learning.

Grouping of Students

RIPTS 5

Instructional groups are inappropriate to support student learning towards the instructional outcomes of the lesson.

Instructional groups are partially appropriate to support student learning in advancing towards the instructional outcomes of the lesson.

Instructional groups are productive and fully appropriate to support students in achieving the instructional outcomes of the lesson.

Students are responsible and accountable for their roles in a team. They self-manage their goals and time. Students interact effectively with team members and support each other in achieving the outcomes of the lesson.

Instructional Materials, and Technologies

RIPTS 5

Instructional materials and technologies are inappropriate for the instructional purposes or do not cognitively engage students.

Instructional materials and technologies are partially appropriate for the instructional purposes and cognitively engage some students.

Instructional materials and technologies are appropriate to the instructional purposes, and are differentiated as appropriate to ensure that most students are cognitively engaged.

Instructional materials and technologies represent multiple perspectives that are relevant to the instructional purposes, are differentiated as appropriate and ensure students are cognitively engaged. Students initiate the choice, adaptation, or creation of materials to enhance their learning and build understanding.

 

 

 

Structure and Pacing

RIPTS 5

The project or lesson has no clearly defined structure, or the pace of the instruction is too slow, rushed, or both.

The project or lesson has a recognizable structure, although it is not uniformly maintained throughout the activities. Pacing of the instruction is inconsistent.

The project or lesson has a clearly defined structure around which the activities are organized. Pacing of the instruction is appropriate.

The projects or lesson’s structure is highly coherent, allowing for reflection and closure. Pacing of the instruction is appropriate for all students.

 


 

Standard 3: Instruction

Component 3d: Using Assessment in Instruction

 

Performance Indicators: Assessment criteria, Monitoring of student learning, Feedback to students Student self-assessment and monitoring of progress

 

Assessment is an integral part of the instructional process. The design of instruction must account for a range of assessment strategies:  formative and summative, formal and informal.  High quality assessment practice makes students fully aware of criteria and performance standards, informs teacher’s instructional decisions, and leverages both teacher and student feedback. Further, these practices also incorporate student self-assessment and teacher analysis and reflection to inform instruction. 

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Assessment Criteria

RIPTS 5, 6, 9

Students are not aware of the criteria and performance standards by which their work will be evaluated.

Students know some of the criteria and performance standards by which their work will be evaluated.

Students are aware of the criteria and performance standards by which their work will be evaluated.

Students are fully aware of the criteria and performance standards by which their work will be evaluated and have contributed to the development of the criteria.

Monitoring Student Learning

 

RIPTS 5, 6, 9

Teacher does not monitor student learning.

 

Teacher minimally monitors student learning, or only assesses learning for the class as a whole. Adjustments to instruction are infrequent or not made when needed.

 

Teacher consistently uses formative assessment strategies to monitor student learning and the progress of the class and of students, and to uncover student misunderstanding and / or misconceptions. Teacher makes general adjustments to instruction when needed.

 

Teacher consistently uses formative assessment strategies, included self and peer-assessments, to monitor student learning and the progress of the class and of individual students, and to uncover student misunderstanding and misconceptions. Teacher makes instructional adjustments to differentiate learning for individual students and the class as a whole. Students assume responsibility for monitoring their learning against the defined achievement standards.

Providing Feedback to Students

 

RIPTS 5, 6, 9

 

Teacher’s feedback to students is limited, general, infrequent and/or irrelevant, resulting in no advancement in learning.

Teacher’s feedback to students is inconsistent, while timely, and useful to help some students advance their learning.

Teacher’s feedback to students is consistent, timely, frequent, and specific, providing individual students with specific direction and information to help advance learning.

Teacher’s feedback to students is of consistent high quality, timely, frequent, and specific, providing individual students with direction and information to help advance their learning. Students make use of the feedback in revising and improving their work.

 

 

 

 

Student Self-Assessment and Monitoring of Progress

 

RIPTS 5, 6, 9

Teacher does not provide students with opportunities to engage in self-assessment or monitoring of their own, or their peer’s progress.

Teacher provides limited opportunities for students to self or peer-assess their progress and learning against assessment criteria and performance standards.

Teacher regularly provides students opportunities to peer and self-assess, resulting in students monitoring their progress and results of their own work against the assessment criteria and performance standards.

 

Teacher provides students and peers on-going opportunities to self and peer assess and monitor their progress and results of their own work against the assessment criteria and performance standards. Students persist to revise and improve their work to attain the standard, and provide exemplars for others.

 


 

Standard 3: Instruction

Component 3e: Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness

 

Performance Indicators: Lesson adjustment, Response to students, Persistence

Effective practitioners demonstrate flexibility and responsiveness in their classroom.  They capitalize on opportunities for student learning by making adjustments to lessons, building on students’ interests, and employing multiple strategies and resources to meet diverse learning needs.

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Adjusts Project/Lesson

RIPTS 4

Teacher adheres rigidly to an instructional plan, even when a change is clearly needed.

Teacher recognizes when student misunderstanding or misconceptions interfere with learning, and attempts to adjust a project or lesson when needed, with only partially successful results.

Teacher recognizes when student misunderstanding or misconceptions interfere with learning and makes a seamless adjustment to a project or lesson that enhances student learning.

Teacher recognizes when student misunderstanding or misconceptions interfere with learning and makes a seamless adjustment to a project or lesson that enhances student learning and ensures all students attain the desired objective.

Responds to Students

RIPTS 4

Teacher ignores or brushes aside students’ questions or interests.

Teacher attempts to accommodate students’ questions or interests, although the pacing of the lesson is disrupted.

Teacher successfully accommodates students’ questions or interests.

Teacher successfully accommodates students’ questions or interests. Teacher recognizes a teachable moment to enhance learning, building on student interests spontaneously.

Persistence

RIPTS 4

When a student has difficulty learning, the teacher either gives up or places blame on other factors when unable to solve student-learning problems.

Teacher accepts responsibility for the success of all students but has only a limited repertoire of instructional strategies to draw on. Teacher attempts to solve learning problems but effort is ineffective or short sighted.

Teacher accepts responsibility for the success of all and individual students. Teacher persists in seeking approaches for students who have difficulty learning, drawing on a broad repertoire of strategies.

Teacher accepts the responsibility for individual student learning, and persists in seeking effective approaches for students who need help, using an extensive repertoire of strategies and soliciting additional resources from colleagues, school, and the community.

 


Standard 4: Professional Responsibilities

 

Standard 4, together with Standards 1 and 5, represents the “behind the scenes” work associated with teaching such as maintaining records, communicating with families and ethical professionalism.  FFT pp.92-3

 

Standard 4: Professional Responsibilities

Component 4a: Maintaining Accurate Records

 

Performance Indicators: Student completion of assignments, Student progress in learning, Non-instructional records

Maintaining accurate instructional and non-instructional records is essential. Accurate records inform interactions with parents, students, and administrators, inform practice and make teachers more responsive to individual student needs by tracking student growth over time. Instructional records would include student assignments, skill lists, records of competencies, grades, portfolios etc. Non-instructional records would include field trip permission slips, picture money, supply orders, book orders, lunch records, discipline referrals etc. Teachers should use available technology for record keeping. Efficiency of operation in record keeping is a key to success. Well -designed and implemented systems require very little ongoing maintenance.  FFT pp. 94-6

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Student Completion of Assignments

RIPTS 9

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student completion of assignments is in disarray.

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student completion of assignments is rudimentary and only partially effective.

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student completion of assignments is effective.

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student completion of assignments is fully effective. Students participate in maintaining the records.

Student Progress in Learning

RIPTS 9

Teacher has no system for maintaining information on student progress in learning, or the system is in disarray. Student growth over time is not evident.

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student progress in learning is rudimentary and only partially effective. Student growth over time is inconsistent or random.

 

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student progress in learning is effective and allows for tracking student growth over time. Students consistently show growth over time.

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student progress in learning is fully effective and clearly tracks each student’s growth over time. Students consistently exceed expectations for growth over time. Students contribute information and interpretation of the records.

Maintains Non-instructional Records

RIPTS 9

Teacher’s records for non-instructional activities are in disarray, resulting in errors and confusion.

Teacher’s records for non-instructional activities are adequate, but they require frequent monitoring to avoid errors.

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on non-instructional activities is effective.

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on non-instructional activities is highly effective, and students contribute to its maintenance.

 


Standard 4: Professional Responsibilities

Component 4b: Communicating with Families

 

Performance Indicators: Information about the instructional program, Information about individual students, Engagement of families in the instructional program

 

Although parents and guardians vary enormously in how active a part they take in their children’s learning, most parents care deeply about the progress of their children and appreciate meaningful participation. Communicating with families involves keeping them informed about how a class is run. Families should not be surprised by information such as rules, how work is assessed, and long and short-term goals for their child. Ideally, moving beyond simple dissemination of information to foster two-way communication can greatly benefit families, students and teachers.  FFT pp. 96-9

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Information About the Instructional Program

RIPTS 7

Teacher provides little or no information about the instructional program to families. Teacher does not utilize available district technology to enhance parent teacher communication.

Teacher participates in the school’s activities for parent communication, but offers little additional information. Teacher minimally uses available district technology to enhance parent-teacher communication.

 

Teacher provides information on a regular basis to families, as appropriate, about the instructional program.

Teacher provides frequent information to families, as appropriate, about the instructional program. Students participate in preparing materials for their families. Both teacher and students to enhance parent-teacher communication use available district technology on a frequent basis.

Information About Individual Students

RIPTS 7

Teacher provides minimal information to parents about individual students, or the communication is inappropriate to the cultures of the families. Teacher does not respond, or responds insensitively to parent concerns about students.

Teacher adheres to the school’s required procedures for communicating with families. Responses to parent concerns are minimal, or may reflect occasional insensitivity to cultural norms.

Teacher communicates with parents about students’ progress on a regular basis, respecting cultural norms, and is available as needed to respond to parent concerns.

Teacher provides information to parents frequently on student progress, with students contributing to the design of the system. Response to parent concerns is handled with great professional and cultural sensitivity.

Engagement of Families in the Instructional Program

RIPTS 7

Teacher makes no attempt to engage families in the instructional program, or such efforts are inappropriate.

Teacher attempts to engage families in the instructional program.

Teacher engages families in the instructional program on a regular basis.

Teacher engages families in the instructional program frequently and successfully. Students contribute ideas that encourage family participation.

 


Standard 4: Professional Responsibilities

Component 4c: Showing Professionalism

 

Performance Indicators: Integrity and ethical conduct, Service to students, Advocacy, Decision making, Compliance with school and district regulations

 

Teaching professionals display the highest standards of integrity and ethical conduct; they are intellectually honest and conduct themselves in ways consistent with a comprehensive moral code. Educators recognize that the purpose of schools is to educate students and embrace a responsibility to ensure, that to the best of their ability, every student will learn. Teachers are keenly alert to and advocate for the needs of their students. Educators demonstrate a commitment to professional standards, problem solving and decision-making. Professional educators comply with school, district, state and federal regulations and procedures. FFT pp. 106-7

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

 Integrity And Ethical Conduct in the Work Place

RIPTS 7, 11

Teacher displays dishonesty in interactions with colleagues, students, and the public.

Teacher is honest in interactions with colleagues, students, and the public.

Teacher displays high standards of honesty, integrity, and confidentiality in interactions with colleagues, students, and the public,

Teacher can be counted on to hold the highest standards of honesty, integrity, and confidentiality, and takes a leadership role with colleagues

Service To Students

RIPTS 7, 11

Teacher is not alert to students’ needs

Teacher’s attempts to serve students are inconsistent

Teacher is active in serving students

Teacher is highly proactive in serving students, seeking out resources when needed.

Advocates for Students

RIPTS 7, 11

Teacher contributes to school practices that result in some students being ill served by the school

Teacher does not knowingly contribute to some students being ill served by the school.

Teacher works to ensure that all students receive a fair opportunity to succeed.

Teacher makes a concerted effort to challenge negative attitudes or practices to ensure that all students, particularly those traditionally underserved, are honored in the school.

Decision Making

RIPTS 7, 11

Teacher makes decisions and recommendations based on self-serving interests

Teacher’s decisions and recommendations are based on limited though genuinely professional considerations.

Teacher maintains an open mind and participates in team or departmental decision making.

Teacher takes a leadership role in team or departmental decision making and helps ensure that such decisions are based on the highest professional standards.

Compliance With School And District Regulations

RIPTS 7, 11

Teacher does not comply with school and district regulations.

Teacher complies minimally with school and district regulations, doing just enough to “get by.”

Teacher complies with school and district regulations.

Teacher complies fully with school and district regulations, taking a leadership role with colleagues.

 

 

 

Complies with State and Federal Law and Regulations

RIPTS 7, 11

 

Teacher does not comply with State and Federal Law and Regulations including but not limited to IEP, 504 plans, AIS services, RTI etc.

Teacher complies minimally with school State and Federal Law and Regulations including but not limited to IEP, 504 plans, AIS services, RTI etc.

Teacher complies with State and Federal Law and Regulations including but not limited to IEP, 504 plans, AIS services, RTI etc

Teacher complies fully with State and Federal Law and Regulations including but not limited to IEP, 504 plans, AIS services, RTI etc. and takes a leadership role actively advocating compliance throughout the school.

 


 

Standard 5: Professional Growth

 

Standard 5- Rationale – Professional Growth

 

Every educator should demonstrate professional growth over time through professional development, reflective practice, lifelong learning and adaptation of practice in response to research and data to improve student learning. (VT, NTSB)

 

Standard 5: Professional Growth

Component 5a: Reflecting on Teaching

 

Performance Indicators: Accuracy, Use in future teaching

 

Reflecting on teaching is the mark of a true professional. The importance of reflection on practice is governed by the belief that teaching can never be perfect yet it can be continually improved. With practice and experience in reflection, teachers can become more discerning and can evaluate both their successes and errors. Reflective practice enhances both teaching and learning. Skilled reflection is characterized by accuracy, specificity and ability to use analysis in future teaching. FFT pp. 92-3

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Is Accurate

RIPTS 10

Teacher does not know whether a lesson was effective or achieved its outcomes, or how to measure a lesson’s effectiveness and whether it achieved its goals, or profoundly misjudges the success of a lesson.

Teacher has a generally accurate impression of a lesson’s effectiveness and can measure the extent to which instructional goals were met.

Teacher makes an accurate assessment of a lesson’s effectiveness and the success to which it achieved its instructional goals; can cite evidence to support the judgment.

Teacher makes a thoughtful and accurate assessment of a lesson’s effectiveness and the extent to which it achieved its goals. Cites specific examples from the lesson and provides rationales for instructional choices.

Uses in Future Teaching

RIPTS 10

Teacher has no suggestions for how a lesson could be improved another time the lesson is taught.

Teacher makes general suggestions about how a lesson could be improved another time the lesson is taught.

Teacher makes specific suggestions of what could be tried another time the lesson is taught.

Teacher offers specific alternative actions. Can justify each instructional options and can predict the probable successes of each different approach.

 

 

 

 

 

Integrates Multiple Perspectives

RIPTS 10

Teacher does not reflect on practice.

Teacher uses some elements of reflective practice such as videotaping, PAR, journaling, or action research in order to strengthen the quality and effectiveness of their practice.

Teacher often analyzes and reflects on his/her practice using some techniques, which may include videotaping, PAR, journaling, or action research in order to strengthen the quality and effectiveness of their practice.

Teacher continually analyzes and reflects upon their practice using various techniques including videotaping, PAR, journaling, or action research in order to strengthen the quality and effectiveness of their practice.

 

 

 


 

Standard 5: Professional Growth

Component 5b: Participating in a Professional Community

 

Performance Indicators: Relationships with colleagues, Involvement in a culture of professional inquiry, Service to the school, Participation in school and district projects

 

Participation in a professional community requires active involvement in a culture of collaboration and inquiry. Relationships with colleagues are an important Performance Indicators of teachers’ participation in a professional community. Professional educators create a culture incorporating systems where expertise, materials, insights and experiences are shared. The goal of the professional community is improving student learning and achievement.

 

Elements / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Relationships with Colleagues

RIPTS 7

Teacher’s relationships with colleagues are negative or self-serving.

Teacher maintains cordial relationship with colleagues to fulfill duties that the school or district requires.

Relationships with colleagues are characterized by mutual support and cooperation.

Relationships with colleagues are characterized by mutual support and cooperation. Teacher takes initiative in assuming leadership roles among the faculty.

Involvement in a Culture of Professional Inquiry

RIPTS 7

Teacher avoids participation in a culture of inquiry, resisting opportunities to become involved.

Teacher becomes involved in the school’s culture of inquiry when invited to do so.

Teacher actively participates in a culture of professional inquiry.

Teacher takes a leadership role in promoting a culture of professional inquiry.

 Service to the School

RIPTS 7

Teacher avoids becoming involved in school events.

Teacher participates in school events when specifically asked.

Teacher volunteers to participate in school events, making a substantial contribution.

Teacher volunteers to participate in school events, making a substantial contribution, and assumes a leadership role in at least one aspect of school life.

Participation in School and District Projects

RIPTS 7

Teacher avoids becoming involved in school and district projects.

Teacher participates in school and district projects when specifically asked.

Teacher volunteers to participate in school and district projects, making a substantial contribution.

Teacher volunteers to participate in school and district projects, making a substantial contribution, and assumes a leadership role in a major school or district project.

 


Standard 5 Professional Growth

Component 5c: Growing and Developing Professionally

 

Performance Indicators: Enhancement of content knowledge and pedagogical skill, Receptivity to feedback from colleagues, Service to the profession

In a world of rapidly expanding access to information, opportunity, and technology, educators have a responsibility to continually prepare themselves to align instruction with transforming student needs. Continued professional growth and development is essential to creating dynamic learning environments. Teachers use information from a variety of sources to inform their professional development and practice.

 

Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Uses Data to Determine Professional Development Needs

RIPTS 1, 10

Teacher does not use information from self and peer analysis, along with data on student achievement to set priorities for professional development.

Teacher minimally uses information from self and peer analysis, along with data on student achievement to set priorities for professional development.

Teacher regularly uses information from self and peer analysis, along with data on student achievement to set priorities for professional development

Teacher continually uses information from self and peer analysis, along with data on student achievement to set priorities for professional development.

Enhancement Content Knowledge and Pedagogical Skill

RIPTS 1, 10

Teacher engages in no professional development activities to enhance knowledge or skill.

Teacher participates in professional activities to a limited extent when they are convenient. Professional development may or may not be aligned with needs.

Teacher seeks out opportunities for professional development to enhance content knowledge and pedagogical skill that align with teacher needs.

Teacher seeks out opportunities for professional development that align with identified needs and makes a systematic effort to conduct action research.

Uses Technology to obtain Professional Development

RIPTS 1, 10

Teacher does not seek opportunities to obtain professional development through technology.

Teacher minimally investigates and accesses professional development opportunities through technology.

Teacher regularly investigates and accesses professional development opportunities through technology as appropriate.

Teacher plays leadership role with peers in promoting professional development opportunities through technology.

Implements Data Analysis and Professional Development

RIPTS 1, 10

Teacher is unaware of relevance of student assessment data, professional development, self-reflection or peer critique as means to improve practice.

Teacher is minimally aware and shows some evidence of understanding the relevance of student assessment data, professional development, self-reflection or peer critique as means to improve practice.

Teacher regularly uses student assessment data, professional development, self-reflection, and peer critique to improve practice.

Teacher continually improves their practice as a result of student assessment data, professional development, self-reflection, peer critique.

Receptive to Feedback from Colleagues

RIPTS 1, 10

Teacher does not incorporate feedback on teaching performance, from either supervisors or more experienced colleagues.

Teacher incorporates, with some reluctance, feedback on teaching performance, from both supervisors and professional colleagues.

Teacher regularly incorporates feedback from colleagues when made by supervisors or when opportunities arise through professional collaboration.

Teacher frequently seeks out and incorporates feedback on teaching, from both supervisors and colleagues.

Provides Service to the Profession

RIPTS 1, 10

Teacher makes no effort to share knowledge with others or to assume professional responsibilities.

Teacher finds limited ways to contribute to the profession.

Teacher participates actively in assisting other educators.

Teacher initiates important activities to contribute to the profession.

 


 

Domain 5: Professional Growth

Component 5d: Developing Professional Development Goals and Completing Yearly Professional Growth Assessments

 

Elements:  Selecting domains for improvement  -  Self Assessment  -  Supporting Assessment / Data  -  Drawing Conclusions / Planning Future Goals

 

Element / Performance Indicators

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Selecting Domain for Professional Development

 

RIPTS 7, 10

No rationale or purpose is apparent in the selection

Some rationale is presented that supports the selection.

Rationale for selection is specific, shows reflection of teaching, and identifies areas in which development will benefit students and aligns with student achievement data.

Rationale for selection is detailed and specific, supported by examples of student work and / or student assessment results, and demonstrates teacher reflection on instruction, student learning, individual, and class achievement.

Self Assessment

 

RIPTS 7, 10

Self-assessment shows little reflection, is not supported by data, details or evidence (e.g. student work) to support findings.

Self-assessment is supported by minimal evidence / examples and data to validate findings, self-reflection is minimal.

Self -assessment is supported by examples and data, findings are validated with student work and assessment data, self-reflections draw conclusions based on findings.

Self-assessment is supported by specific examples and data, which connect to identified goals.  Findings are validated with specific examples (e.g. student work and achievement data) and conclusions demonstrate reflection and desire for improvement.

Supporting Assessment / Data Collection

 

RIPTS 7, 10

Assessment / data shows little correlation to self-assessment or teacher development goals.

Assessment / data is connected to goals, and is related to self-assessment.  Evidence of some alignment and coordination exists.

Assessment / data is well designed and tightly aligned to professional growth goals, provides detailed data to validate findings, and can be used as a method to document findings and measure future growth.

Assessment / data is well designed and tightly aligned to professional growth goals, provides detailed data that validates findings, and contains evidence of professional collaboration with students and peers to further professional development.

Drawing Conclusions, Planning SMART Goals

 

RIPTS 7, 10

Conclusions are not supported by assessments / data, there is no connection to the SMART goals.

Conclusions supported by assessment / data findings.  SMART Goals provide directions for professional development.

Conclusions supported by assessment / data findings.  SMART Goals establish connections to district initiatives, and professional development.

SMART Goals and conclusions connect professional development and school/district goals, providing exemplars for others, will support professional licensure requirements and chart a course for future development areas.

 

 

 


 

 

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